Smart Scorecard for Development Projects

Smart Scorecard For Development Projects January 2002
6
Caveats:
We have purposefully designed the Scorecard to be flexible so that each community can determine
what criteria should receive greater emphasis, and which benchmarks can be “upgraded” or
“loosened” in order to better fit near-term goals.
The identified measures require greater scrutiny, especially for projects in rural settings where it is
difficult to address most Smart Growth objectives. However, we recognize the great need to
upgrade the design of “leapfrog”developments when they are allowed by a community’s Land Use
Map.
The size of a development parcel will certainly alter how some measures can be achieved. Most
criteria assume that larger opportunity sites will receive the bulk of a community’s interest. Future
drafts should identify when applicable smaller lot measures (i.e. less than 1-2 acres) that are more
typical for urban infill sites.
We have combined Urban and Suburban measures as the approach to reducing development
impacts are very similar in both situations.
The Scorecard does not identify when a project should not be built -- if one or two Smart Growth
criteria are way off the chart but the project is acceptable in most other categories.
Following the checklist, we identify several ways that the Scorecard can be implemented as part of
a local Smart Growth program. “City Responsibilities” are identified with each category to
encourage public measures that can leverage much greater private-sector response.
We propose that 10 critical components be used to focus where the biggest “Smart-Bang-for-the-
Buck” lies: (Please see the accompanying Excel spreadsheet for the actual Scorecard document).
1. PROXIMITY TO EXISTING/FUTURE DEVELOPMENT AND
INFRASTRUCTURE;
2. MIX AND BALANCE OF USES;
3. SITE OPTIMIZATION AND COMPACTNESS;
4. ACCESSIBILITY AND MOBILITY CHOICES;
5. COMMUNITY CONTEXT AND SITE DESIGN;
6. FINED-GRAINED BLOCK, PEDESTRIAN AND PARK NETWORK;
7. ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY;
8. DIVERSITY;
9. RE-USE AND REDEVELOPMENT OPTIONS;
10. PROCESS COLLABORATION AND PREDICTABILITY OF
DECISIONS
_______________________________________________________________
__________
1. PROXIMITY TO EXISTING/FUTURE DEVELOPMENT AND
INFRASTRUCTURE
Developing new projects near existing neighborhoods can go a long way to achieve many
Smart Growth goals. Existing neighborhoods provide some of the critical support for new
residential and commercial development -- roads, schools, bus service, water, electrical and
sewer capacity may already be available. Projects located away from the urban fabric usually
require additional services, new civic amenities, and longer car trips to gain access to these
necessities. The ability to add new development adjacent to existing residents and workers
Page 6/27
Free Download

Smart Scorecard for Development Projects PDF

Favor this template? Just fancy it by voting!
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
(0 Votes)
0.0
Related Forms
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
5 Page(s) | 2027 Views | 11 Downloads
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
16 Page(s) | 3511 Views | 5 Downloads
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
77 Page(s) | 7759 Views | 8 Downloads
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
65 Page(s) | 6809 Views | 5 Downloads
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
7 Page(s) | 2138 Views | 11 Downloads